Tag Archives: grammartime

‘Pore’ or ‘Pour’?

poringPeople often confuse the two verbs. You pour a cocktail and then pore over a book.

Pore, in this sense, can only be used in conjunction with ‘over’ or ‘through’ and means to be absorbed in the reading or study of.

Pour means to flow or cause to flow in a steady stream; to prepare and serve (a drink).

My trick for remembering it is to think of the in pour as like a tiny bucket that things could be poured into. So this is the spelling to use when thinking of flowing.

“She filled a bowl with cereal. She poured over the milk.” This would mean that she put milk on her Corn Flakes.

“She filled a bowl with cereal. She pored over the milk.” This means that she stopped after getting her Corn Flakes to examine the milk closely.

pouring

Similarly, if one were to write, “She poured over her book” we would all wonder what she’d poured over it and why.

Pore is also a noun, meaning the tiny holes in faces, but let’s not worry about that now.

Was that of any use to you at all? Likes, shares and comments all wildly appreciated.

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‘Further’ or ‘Farther’?

These are often used interchangeably and are commonly accepted to be synonyms. Both words share the sense of going beyond. However, there is still a proper, formal way to use them.

Farther is used for a physical distance. Think far away. If you could fit the words a greater physical distance in place of it, it is correct to use farther.

“Is there farther to go before we turn?”

“Is there a greater physical distance to go before we turn?”

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F. Scott Fitzgerald knew how to use them.

Further can be used for less concrete notions and all that metaphysical jazz:

“Without further ado…”

Further to your letter…”

“We’ve made further progress on the research.”

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Filed under Common Errors, Proofreading